The news media spend lots of time telling us who we should vote for.  Currently they are telling us to vote for H. Clinton. Can we trust the news media to tell us the truth? No.  Most of the major news media organizations are owned by big corporations. Large companies have an interest in big government. Why?

  • They can afford to “buy” legislators with campaign donations and favorable media. Their bought legislators give them competitive advantages through regulations and tax laws (Tariffs against foreign competition is a biggie.).
  • Big corporations have an edge in getting government contracts.  When the government spends $6 trillion a year, that’s a significant part of their income.

So the mass media has an economic incentive in being biased towards big government. Since H. Clinton is the big government candidate, most of the news media trashes Donald Trump. Here is another simple example of how they do it. Supposedly Trump is preposterously arrogant. Here was The Hill‘s title on a January 23rd article, “Trump: I could shoot people in streets and not lose support“. What did Trump say?

Lauding his fans’ loyalty at a campaign event in Sioux Center, Iowa, on Saturday, Trump said he could kill people and still be popular.

“I have the most loyal people, did you ever see that? I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot people and I wouldn’t lose voters,” he said.

Sounds awful! So CNN added to the mischief in its version of the story, Trump: I could ‘shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose voters’, by using the story to pit Ted Cruz against Donald Trump. Worked, I am sad to say.

The Daily Caller, on the other hand, at least provided a video in its report, Trump Says That He Could Shoot Somebody And ‘Wouldn’t Lose Any Voters’ [VIDEO], that puts that quote in context. After listening to the quote in context, it is obvious that Trump intended nothing more than a bit of hyperbole.

Want to see the whole speech? The video below provides that. The part of speech where that quote appears begins at 1:24 minutes into the video.



vote for americaI just finished watching Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have a go at it in their second and last debate.  Trump began the debate obviously nervous and angry. H. Clinton started off smugly composed.

Consider what had just happened. Before the start of this second debate, the news media released that abominable, ten-year old video. Why now? Of course, the release of that video was designed to shake Trump up just before the debate and to maximize the “news value”.

Obviously, Wikileaks had similar notions when it released transcripts Hillary Clinton’s private speeches.

Trump, however, had the much greater problem. The news media doesn’t much care if H. Clinton lies to the voters, however, the fact that Trump engaged in locker room talk ten years ago was major news.  So a bunch of chickens in the GOP establishment deserted Trump, and the moderators just had to get to that question.

Thus, the debate began just about as ugly as it could get, which, of course is what both the news media and H. Clinton apparently wanted. Eventually, however, the town hall format forced the debaters to focus on issues. Trump then cooled and composed himself, and H. Clinton grew strangely more anxious. Now why would that be the case? That is something to think about.

Here is one more thing to think about. Why do we have such an awful choice of presidential candidates? Why all the name calling in the debate? The answer is not complex. Instead of voting for what is good for our country, too many of us have voted for what we think is good for us personally. Instead of voting for the best among us, we have voted for those candidates willing to make the most extravagant promises with “other people’s money”.

Because they involve extravagant promises with “other people’s money”, Hillary Clinton’s promises are simply empty talk. She cannot deliver what she promises; it is not possible. All she can do is redistribute the wealth, and redistributing the wealth eventually kills an economy. That’s why our economy is already stagnant.

Trump has a slightly different appeal. He promises to make America great again. Implicit within that promise is the understanding he will stop trying to redistribute more and more of our wealth. He will let us get back to work so we can make America great again.

In truth, only God can make America great again, but God isn’t likely to help us if we keep trying to use our government to rob each other.


Here is a video of the entire debate.

I thought both men performed competently.  I did not listen to it live. So I heard the press reports before I listened to the debate. After I listen to the debate, I wondered what those reporters watched. Hence, I encourage everyone to listen to the video.

Kaine did interrupt Pence quite a bit.  Why? He was probably both trying to throw Pence off stride and cover up his words. I thought the moderator, however, did a relatively decent job. She asked pertinent questions, and she let both men answer without trying to “fact check.”

Kaine focused on Donald Trump. He tried to make a long string of out context quotes and Trump’s taxes the issue. Pence did not take the bait. He focused on issues and Clinton’s record.  He defended Trump, but he did not waste his time trying to answer every charge. So he won on substance.


branches of governmentHere is a thoughtful email from Delegate Scott Lingamfelter. He sent it out Friday, but I thought it best to hold over for Monday morning.

Scott Lingamfelter

Don’t be Fooled: You’re Actually Electing a Government

This is a bit long, but I hope you will take time to read it.  I think it’s important.

People have said to me, “Good grief, we have 320 million people in the US and look at the choices we have for President!”

True.  On the one hand we have a fellow, Donald Trump, who is brash, outspoken, politically incorrect, and one of the most successful businessmen in the US.  On the other hand, we have a person, Hillary Clinton, who is contemptuous of the military, thinks Americans aren’t smart enough to manage their own lives, wants to raise taxes even when the economy is growing at an anemic 1%, was a horrible Secretary of State, and jeopardizes our national secrets with an illegal email system (and then lies about it to your face).  But worst of all, she has become wealthy by duping money out of Clinton Foundation donors or through pay-to-play schemes using her government position to give access to those donors for their support of her political objectives.

Trump’s and Clinton’s view of foreign policy, the economy, jobs, the role of government, and the Supreme Court could not be more different.  It’s a stark contrast.  A brash outsider vs. a corrupt insider.  He insults.  She lies.  He says what he’s thinking instead of thinking what he’s saying.  She says what she thinks you want to hear and thinks what she says is truth, even when it isn’t.  His mind “arcs” from one politically controversial comment or thought to another.  Her mind “short circuits”, her way of justifying her lies.

Moreover, Clinton’s view is that if you’re supporting Trump, somehow you are a “deplorable” person at best and filled with “implicit racism” at worst.  This is an insult to all Americans, and it says a lot about how Clinton will approach the Presidency: with a smug moral superiority that says she is better and far smarter than the rest of us.  She isn’t.

Which brings me to this point.  You may be in a place where you are not happy with either candidate.  I understand.  But you need to remember this.  We’re not just voting for a person; we’re voting for an administration.

Much in the same way that a parliamentary system “votes-in a government” that will control the policy of the country, maybe we should look at this strange election through that lens.

Trump has chosen a strong, effective, and conservative governor in Mike Pence to be his Vice President; which is a good indication of the kind of solid people he will choose for his cabinet. And don’t be fooled, we’re not only voting for a Vice President, but also a cabinet; the senior people who will run the government, the administration that will choose judges, the policies that will be ended or begun, and the executive structure that will work with or oppose Congress.  We are voting for an administration in the fullest sense of the word.

A Trump or Clinton administration will take dramatically different paths.

  • He has made clear that he will work with the conservative Heritage Foundation and the Federalists Society in choosing Supreme Court nominees.  She will depend on the likes of left-looney Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren to pick judges.
  • He will lower taxes, Clinton will raise them.
  • He will take on ISIS, she will be as weak as she was as Secretary of State.
  • He will grow jobs; she will grow government.
  • He will shift power back to the states. She will create a vortex of power from state capitols to Washington.
  • He will be about us; she will be about her.

That’s what their respective administrations will look like, folks.  So as you consider the choices, think beyond the two candidates before us.  Because who we elect will have a bigger impact than you may think beyond their personalities.  You are electing an entire government. In that regard, this election may be the first that is truly about an entire approach to government, an administration.  Don’t forget that when you ponder what to do in November.

Share this with a friend and VOTE!