BECAUSE IT ISN’T LEGAL, IT IS IMMORAL

A flowering cannabis plant (from here)

I spent years in college dormitories during the 70’s.  At the end that period, I was not actually in a dorm. Instead I was in a two bedroom apartment. To deal with the overflow, the college put us up in an apartment complex and bused us to campus.  It did not take long before I saw my roommates taking advantage of the situation. After a pot party and waking up to find my roommate had a young woman in bed with him (two separated events), I decided to seek my own quarters. Why? I was not a Christian then, but I had been brought up as one. So that sort of behavior rankled. I liked my roommates, but I did not want to be forced to approve of blatantly bad behavior.

Could I have expressed my feelings back then? No. In fact, my thoughts were rather shallow.

  • I knew having sex with someone other than my wife was wrong, but all I thought of was the possibility of pregnancy and disease. I did not yet understand the importance or the significance of the two becoming one.
  • Smoking marijuana mostly struck me as foolish. It was not unusual to walk down a dorm hall and smell something that stank. Soon I figured out what that stink was, and then I had only one thought. People are inhaling that? I had watched what tobacco and alcohol had done to my father. So I wanted no part of a drug that combined the worst features of both, but I gave little thought of how such bad behavior might affect others.

Anyway, the focus here is on marijuana.  So how did — how does — the use of an illegal drug effect others? Well, I understand some people see nothing wrong with using marijuana. Supposedly, inhaling that reeking stench only puts thrill seekers temporarily and slightly out of their minds. Nonetheless, marijuana remains illegal, and that means that in addition to setting a bad example for the gullible (like college students), when we use marijuana and other illegal drugs we fund criminal networks.

Purchasing illegal drugs is an immoral act, regardless of where one stands in the legalization debate. When drugs are legally prohibited, criminal organizations assume control of production and distribution, making violence inherent in the process. Drug proceeds are used to fund criminal and terrorist organizations, enabling them to murder innocent people, attack police and military, bleed our tax dollars, and destroy the rule of law.

Drugs are a major source of income for terrorist groups and other criminal organizations, due to the high profit margins in these illegal markets. For example, one kilogram of heroin costs $2,500-$5,000 in Afghanistan and it sells for $60,000-$90,000 in the United States. That same kilogram is worth approximately $1.5 million after is it diluted and divided into individual dosage units. Profits made from illegal drug sales are also unreported income, allowing unlawful enterprises to remain in the shadows.

There is a strong nexus between drug trafficking and terrorism. According to DEA’s FY2016 Performance Budget Congressional Submission, 22 of 59 designated Foreign Terrorist Organizations had possible ties to drug trafficking. This number is probably low, because evidence is difficult to obtain, and it doesn’t address two recently designated terrorist groups. As an example, Afghanistan produces most of the world’s opium, morphine, and heroin. In Afghanistan, drug producers, traffickers, and transporters have deep connections to the Taliban, Haqqani network, and other terrorist groups. Drug traffickers use terrorists for protection and terrorists use drug traffickers to fund their activities. (from here)

 

 

REGISTERED TO COMMIT VOTER FRAUD?

Here we have an article from The Washington Times.

Maryland county’s count suggests noncitizens voting across U.S.

The debate over noncitizens voting was a hot topic a few years ago in Frederick County, a prosperous Maryland suburb wedged between Washington’s urban metropolis and the state’s rural western gateway to the rest of America.

Conservative activists went to court to show that noncitizens were registering fraudulently to vote. A court employee met their request by turning over pages of residents’ names disqualified from jury duty because of alien status.

When those lists were compared with voting records for just three years — 2007, 2008 and 2011 — nearly 180 noncitizens were found to have registered to vote. Of those, 63 had voted, some in multiple elections. The 180 registered votes came from 1,400 disqualified noncitizens in those three years, a rate of 12.8 percent.

The issue of noncitizen voters has taken on national importance. President Trump, who said 3 million or so voted illegally in November, plans to name a federal task force to investigate.

Frederick County’s numbers offer a limited snapshot from a handful of jury pools, but they indicate that noncitizens are registered to vote and are casting ballots in states, which administer federal, state and local elections.

“Obviously, there are people on the voting rolls who have no business being on the voter rolls,” said conservative activist Daniel M. Gray, a lawyer who filed the lawsuit. “What needs to be determined is how extensive is this. How many noncitizens weren’t summoned for jury duty and went ahead and voted?” (continued here)

Have you heard of any prosecutions in Maryland for voter fraud? Well, there have supposedly been a few, but not related to this Washington Times story. Generally, what the news media does is pan any possibility that someone might even think of voter fraud.

Here are some examples from this region, Maryland in particular.

The news media’s calmness with respect to voter fraud is strangely odd. Any other issue and they treat it as a crisis. Voter fraud? A strange exception.

In fact, the news media has made one odd exception with their reporting on voter fraud. They are quite willing to report on how Russia supposedly hacked our elections. They have even managed to produce voluminous reports without any evidence, none at all.

Are any politicians trying to do anything about voter fraud? Well, Virginia is my home state, and Delegate Rob Bell is certainly focusing on the issue.

Dear Citizen,

Last week, Governor McAuliffe vetoed my House Bill 2343, which would require state officials to provide local registrars with the list of their voters who are also registered to vote in another state. You can read an article about the veto by clicking here.

This follows McAuliffe’s vetoes of a bill to require photo IDs for absentee ballots and a bill to investigate why some localities have more registered voters than voting-age residents. As of today, McAuliffe has vetoed more bills than any other Virginia Governor.

Think we should do all we can to clean up our voter rolls? Tell Governor McAuliffe by clicking here.

We will be taking up these vetoes and any other amendments when the General Assembly reconvenes in Richmond on April 5. While my bill was supported by every Republican Delegate and State Senator, we will need some additional help to get to the 2/3 we need to override the veto. If you have a Democratic representative (Delegate or State Senator), please encourage him to support the bill.

Sincerely,

Delegate Rob Bell

If you are represented by any Democrat Liberals in the General Assembly, please let them know you want fraud-free elections and you would like to see the Governor’s vetoes overturned.  If you are represented by any Republicans, please thank them.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A COLLECTIVE AND A COMMUNITY?

Charity without love is not charitable.

More than we know we do combat with words.  Consider the etymology of these ideological words. Consider what happens when the words “collective” and “community” become wrapped into isms.

Collectivism has strong associations with communism.

collectivism (n.)Look up collectivism at Dictionary.com
1880, in socialist theory, from collective + -ism. Related: Collectivist (1882 as both noun and adjective); collectivization (1890).

It seems that some would have us believe that the mere act of organizing people into a group with a common interest is communistic.

The word “community” has multiple associations with isms.

Like communism, communitarianism also emphasizes the community over the individual.

communitarian (n.) Look up communitarian at Dictionary.com
1841, “member of a commune,” from community + ending from utilitarian, etc. The adjective is attested from 1909.

Communitarianism is not the same as communism, but it does emphasize the interests of the community over the individual.

Like Communitarianism, communism is related to community via the word “commune“.

communism (n.) Look up communism at Dictionary.com
“social system based on collective ownership,” 1843, from French communisme (c. 1840) from commun (Old French comun; see common (adj.)) + -isme (see -ism). Originally a theory of society; as name of a political system, 1850, a translation of German Kommunismus (itself from French), in Marx and Engels’ “Manifesto of the Communist Party.” Compare communist. In some cases in early and mid-20c., a term of abuse implying anti-social criminality without regard to political theory.

Each [i.e. socialism, communism, anarchism] stands for a state of things, or a striving after it, that differs much from that which we know; & for many of us, especially those who are comfortably at home in the world as it is, they have consequently come to be the positive, comparative, & superlative, distinguished not in kind but in degree only, of the terms of abuse applicable to those who would disturb our peace. [Fowler]

We even have something called communalism which is similar to communitarianism. Instead of a strong central government, however, both communitarianism and communalism emphasize creating a federation of communes, just not for the same reasons.

communalism (n.) Look up communalism at Dictionary.com
1871 (in reference to Paris), from communal + -ism.

Thanks to all these mushy isms, it is a little difficult to speak of the difference between a collective and a community.  Nevertheless, people form collectives deliberately for a specific purpose. Whereas people form communities by living together and forming strong ties with each other.

Therefore, only when we speak of a community does it make sense to apply this verse.

John 13:35 New King James Version (NKJV)

35 By this all will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another.”

When we form charitable organizations, because there is a personal relationship it makes sense to provide charity at the community level.  Unfortunately, our political leaders have created new and improved charities.  They have used the state, especially that great collective we call the Federal Government, to give away our tax dollars using expensive health, education, and welfare programs.  Hence we have politicians spending other people’s money on people they don’t even know. The result has been phenomenal fraud, waste and abuse.

Ideally, because the personal relationship between those who give and those who receive charity is so important (It is about love, after all.), charity should only be the function of local, private organizations. Only when we have no other alternative should we involve government, and that should be local government. Only when we have no other alternative should we involve either the state or the Federal Government.

What is the big issue of the moment in Washington DC? It is Obamacare.  What is Obamacare? It is about whether the average American will be able to make his or her health choices without overriding interference from nameless bureaucrats. It about disconnecting the desires of people who pay the bills from the people who provide health care services. It is about giving politicians power just because they want it. It about turning our whole healthcare system into a wasteful and inefficient government-run charity rife with fraud, waste, and abuse.

Please let your senators and congressman know you want Obamacare repealed. You want them to do the same thing they did when they knew Obama would veto their repeal bill. Then you want them to replace Obamacare with laws that allow us to use our own money to make our own decisions. Do we really need their help to provide charity for our neighbors, the people in our communities. No. Not if we actually care about each other. If we don’t, there is nothing they can do anyway. If we don’t care, they won’t either.

 

 

DELEGATE ROB BELL ON VOTER FRAUD

voteOne of the signs that our republic is falling apart is the fact we are less and less willing to protect the integrity of the vote. Fortunately, we still have leaders willing to fight for our republic. Here is an email I received from Delegate Rob Bell today.

rob-bell-for-attorney-general
Dear Richard,

Today’s Washington Post headline: “He fought in World War II. He died in 2014. And he just registered to vote in Va.” According to the article, a JMU student in Harrisonburg registered 19 dead Virginians to vote in the 2016 election.  Read it by clicking here.

This follows on a TV news report of a long-dead voters who have nonetheless cast ballots in Colorado.

Virginia is a battleground state, and every vote is important. In the General Assembly, I have long supported the photo ID requirement and other voter fraud bills. Election crimes like that in Harrisonburg prove these laws are needed.

You’d think honest elections would receive bipartisan support, but Terry McAuliffe vetoed an absentee ballot measure in 2015 and Attorney General Mark Herring refused to defend Virginia’s photo ID law against a lawsuit funded by George Soros. Virginia taxpayers had to pay private lawyers $600,000 in taxpayer money to do the job Herring was elected to do, and the case is still being considered by the federal court.

Enough!  Stand against voter fraud – sign the online petition by clicking here.

Sincerely,

Delegate Rob Bell
Candidate for Attorney General

If you do not think voter fraud is real, then consider.

  • We have a political party that features “campaign finance reform” as one of its big issues. If we are supposed to believe that rich people will buy politicians, why are we not also supposed to believe that rich people will buy elections?
  • We are supposed to believe that voter ID is all about voter suppression.  If we are willing to believe people would suppress the votes of some people, why are we not willing to believe that other people would over-count the  votes they like?
  • Hillary Clinton is a known liar. There is no doubt about it. Even under oath she will lie and deceive. (And I see reason to debate the obvious. Look it up.) Why are we supposed to believe that a political party that would select someone as dishonest as Hillary Clinton as its presidential nominee does not have people in it who are capable of voter fraud?