MAKING VOTER FRAUD ABSURDLY EASY

It is a fact of life. If we don’t want people to do something, we make it difficult for them to do it. That why, because we don’t want strangers entering our homes, we put locks on the doors. Some people, however, strive to be willfully ignorant. Burglars, for example.

So it is I read this editorial with disgust.

How people feel about voter fraud often breaks down along partisan lines. Most conservatives feel that it’s a serious problem, while liberals tend to scoff. They either claim that it doesn’t happen, or that it doesn’t happen enough to make a real difference.

Tell that to William Gardner. New Hampshire’s secretary of state is a Democrat who wants to rid the Granite State of what he calls “drive-by voting” — a type of fraud in which people from out of state come for a short period to vote on Election Day. (continued here)

Google “new hampshire” “drive by voting” and you will find plenty of articles on the subject. Some people will say we need to get rid of the problem. Others will say there is no evidence of a problem. I would just like the latter folks to get rid of all the security systems (locks, peep holes, home and car security alarms, and so forth) that they use to protect their stuff. Think of all the trouble they would avoid pretending there is no evidence they need such things.

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8 thoughts on “MAKING VOTER FRAUD ABSURDLY EASY

  1. You might think the libs might have learned something after Wikileaks exposed their intrigue in the election. Just proves again King Solomon proverb; As a dog returns to his vomit, so does a fool return to his folly

    Regards and goodwill blogging.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I have read the Washington Times article and looked into the three examples it gives. It is interesting, which information was not included in the article.

    1) Rosa Maria Ortega, non-citizen voter and sentenced to eight years for it, voted Republican (AG cancidate Baxton, presidential candidate Romney) according to her lawyer (and yes, I am aware that she may well be lying about this)

    2) Vafalay Massaquoi forged voter applications for a liberal group. What is being left out in the reporting: the liberal group itself had suspicions about his forms and handed them over to authorities for investigation.

    3) Maureen Marie Moss forged signatures on petitions to get U.S. Senate candidate Jon Keyser. What goes unmentioned: Jon Keyser is a Republican.

    I find these observations mildly ironic, to be honest.

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    1. @marmoewp

      It is apparent you are missing the forest for the trees. We can always find something an author might have said and wax eloquent about how ironic it was he might have said this or that. The author makes the point that even Democrat William Gardner, New Hampshire’s secretary of state, wants to fix this problem.

      Am I trying to prove all Democrats are crooked? No. If all Democrats are crooked, then I may as well give and advocate for a tyrant. Although I generally find it easier to agree with the philosophy espoused by Republicans, I don’t doubt many in the Republican Party’s leadership can be tempted by the desire for power too.

      Sin is a people thing, not a political party thing. Most of us are either lazy or too distracted by other issues to pay politics much attention. Because our education system is run by government, most of us learn very little in school about how government is suppose to work. Worst, most of us don’t appreciate how easily we can be corrupted, that giving a few people great power is extremely dangerous. Instead, too many of us just expect everyone to do the right thing. Because the alternative means more work, we disregard the fact we know better, that appreciable numbers will do no such thing. Hence, while most of us scratch our collective heads, wondering what is going on, we have bunches of people scheming to grasp and hold power.

      If we don’t keep our election system functional, we have no hope of buying enough time to reverse the current trend.

      Anyway, stupid nonsense like drive-by voting is simply absurd, I you had nothing to say about that. Do either of us have to wonder why?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Do I consider drive-by voting to be a desirable behaviour? No, as these voters will usually not have a vested interest in the long-term outcome for the residents. Is it illegal in New Hampshire? No, it is not, and calling it fraud, i.e. unlawful, is disingenious. You seem to miss this distinction, as you are happy to quote drive-by voting being called fraud.

        Same-day registration, which is at the root of drive-by voting, has been enacted in NH to avoid the implementation of the Motor Voter Act by a then uniform Republican government (State House, State Senate, Governor), i.e. you can not simply scrap same-day registration w/o establishing registration at DMV offices, which NH does not support and does not intend to introduce. All proposal claimed to address drive-by voting offered so far, have been found unconstitutional in other states with same-day registration, AFAIK.

        By the way, I presume you are of course aware that there is just one part-time attorney at the New Hampshire Attorney General’s office dedicated to election law? Would you not think, it would be prudent to provide funding for more attorneys dedicated in that area, seeing that 50 election law complaint investigations were open in September 2016, ranging from alleged push-polls to voter fraud? More than a dozen of which date back to 2012? How about providing the AG with the manpower required to act on the existing laws, before calling for more regulation? Laws are meaningless w/o enforcement.

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        1. @marmoewp

          Someone who makes their home in another state is not suppose to vote in NH’s elections. If the citizens of NH thought that was the purpose of the law, I doubt they would approve. Kind of dumb, don’t you think.

          The Motor Voter Act is a Federal Law (=> https://www.justice.gov/crt/national-voter-registration-act-1993-nvra). I don’t like that one either, but people get the notion every state has to everything the same way. Kind of defeats the whole point of Federalism.

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        2. @marmoewp

          BTW – I suppose I should thank you for your observation on the lack of enforcement manpower in the New Hampshire Attorney General’s office for election law. Not much point in making a law and then not enforcing it, but politicians do that sort of thing. The pay lip service to an idea, but then they don’t enforce it, sort of like that fence on our southern border.

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