Is the United States a Christian nation? — Reblogged from altruistico

constitution1.pngIn Is the United States a Christian nation?, altruistico tackles a controversial subject.

It may seem intuitive, at first, to attempt to answer this question by focusing on government. But the best way to determine whether or not the United States is a Christian nation is to compare the philosophy of its people to the Word of God.

The Declaration of Independence states that every person has these God-given, inalienable rights: life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. This philosophy is what we could call the “American Worldview,” and it drives everything about the nation— from its economic and foreign policy to the private lives of its people. This is the atmosphere in which most of us have grown up. But can this American Worldview be called a Christian Worldview? Can we really call the United States a Christian nation? (continued here)

approaches the question from a different direction than I have. He considers whether Americans actually practice Christianity, and sadly, he concludes we do not.

Is correct in his conclusion. I think so, but there is a subtlety that I think is worth adding. Men of no other faith would have written these lines.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. –That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, –That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. (from here)

When the Christians who founded this nation wrote the Constitution, they did not attempt to force everyone to become a Christian. If they had done that, they would not have created a Christian nation; they would just have created a nation where to save their skin everyone claimed to be Christian.

When the founders wrote and debated the Constitution, they sought to protect a Christian belief. They put that right in the First Amendment, the right of each individual to follow the dictates of their own conscience.

The founders believed God granted each man and woman the right and the responsibility to find Him in their own way. For although there is only one Way to salvation, through Christ Jesus, we do not and cannot all find and know our Lord in the same way. Because God made us each unique — with different lives and experiences — each of us must find our own way to our savior.

Thus, even though we are not a Christian nation and may not even be a nation of Christians, God has blessed us with a Christian heritage. And that heritage is something even the Atheists among us can learn (if they have any wisdom at all) to appreciate.

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About Citizen Tom

I am just an average citizen interested in promoting informed participation in the political process.
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18 Responses to Is the United States a Christian nation? — Reblogged from altruistico

  1. You might be surprised at my take on this. I will write something later.

    ===|==============/ Keith DeHavelle

  2. Sure would be nice if all religious leaders met together and came up with a common belief. For example, good will to all rather than my God is better than your God. Religious beliefs originate from the country you were born and taught. The US is a melting pot of cultures because of the US Immigration policies and either we as a nation learn to accept each other’s cultures as brother or sisters or religious intolerance will lead to terrorism as what is happening now in the world.

    Regards and good will blogging.

    • We as a nation (the US) accept each others’ cultures; this is woven into our Constitution and is evidenced by our daily practices in the 21st century.

      The religious intolerance of jihadism wants to wipe us off the face of the Earth anyway, and they are taking active steps to do so, here and abroad.

      ===|==============/ Keith DeHavelle

      • What religion is jihadism?

        • I do not think that you will be shocked to learn that jihadists are Muslims. The religion is Islam. The particular sect is less crucial, as jihadists are Sunni and Shiite, with a sprinkling of others. One sect in particular, who translate in English to “Qur’an only,” are never jihadists so far as I know. They tend to be good people, in opposition to the jihadists and their apologists. But the Qur’an only folks are generally marginalized, and there is no country where they hold sway.

          In the “500 Most Influential Muslims” (my copy is from 2009), about two-thirds of the top 50 are jihadists or jihadist apologists and supporters. For example, Qaradawi, the radical with 60 million radio listeners who calls constantly for the destruction of the United States and Israel, is #9:

          9. Sheikh Dr Yusuf Qaradawi, Head of the International Union of
          Muslim Scholars

          Like many of the others, Qaradawi is listed as a terrorist by many countries. At the pulpit, holding his AK-47 high, he influences millions of wannabe terrorists. They then go out and kill local Christians, because they are within easy reach.

          This is jihadism.

          The people who oppose jihadist interpretations are denigrated in this list as practicing “Islamic modernism”:

          Islamic modernism is a reform movement started by politically-minded urbanites with scant knowledge of traditional Islam. These people had witnessed and studied Western technology and socio-political ideas, and realized that the Islamic world was being left behind technologically by the West and had become too weak to stand up to it. They blamed this weakness on what they saw as ‘traditional Islam,’ which they thought held them back and was not ‘progressive’ enough. They thus called for a complete overhaul of Islam, including—or rather in particular—Islamic law (sharia) and doctrine (aqida). Islamic modernism remains popularly an object of derision and ridicule, and is scorned
          by traditional Muslims and fundamentalists alike.

          This does not hold much hope for the modernists.

          Or us, for that matter.

          ===|==============/ Keith DeHavelle

        • Why do they hate us so much as to want to kill themselves killing us? What did we do?

        • The dozens of cultures/nations that Islam has subjugated since the religion was founded in about 620AD did not have to do anything. They were not Muslims. Or, in some cases, not the right flavor of Muslims. That is sufficient.

          This is not driven from hate, though that is used as a tool.

          Ron Paul’s misunderstanding of this point is foolish … and deadly.

          ===|==============/ Keith DeHavelle

      • Citizen Tom says:

        I did not expect this post to get into jihadism, but jihadism does well illustrate the problem that Christians tried to solve with the Constitution. What is sad is that the jihadist philosophy is not exclusive to Islam. The historical norm is for people to assault those who do not share their beliefs. In fact, in one respect Islam is historical superior to what some believed in the past. So long as another people shares the correct version of Islam (whatever that might be), Islam does not provide an excuse for persecution.

        Christianity, however, offers two articles of faith that promote peace between men. Christianity says:
        1. Christ Jesus came to save all men.
        2. To be saved, we must freely accept Jesus as our savior. The right to make that choice is something God gave us, and no one can make it for us.

        Therefore, we have no right to abuse anyone. We are obligated to love even our enemies. Jesus commanded us to spread the Gospel and work for the salvation of all souls.

    • Citizen Tom says:

      Thanks for the comment.

      Of course we both know there is no possibility that our religious leaders will on their own come up with a common belief about God. I fear human nature — our sinful pride — stands in the way.

      What you refer to as religious tolerance, I think it more appropriate to call forbearance.

      This post addresses the difference between the terms.
      http://citizentom.com/2008/12/26/homosexual-rights-and-liberty-enforced-tolerance-versus-forbearance/

      Here is an example of forbearance.
      http://citizentom.com/2009/01/20/an-example-of-forbearance/

      The beliefs of some make it impossible for them to forbear the existence of others who do not share their own beliefs.

  3. Thanks for the two links. I can understand forbearance on the issue of color of skin. On the issue of homosexuality, a problem arises when government mandates that children be taught in first grade to believe that homosexuality is nature and not nurture when there is no proof positive that is 100 percent accurate. By teaching children this concept, government is contributing to nurturing children to believe homosexuality is nature and the end result is that government is in effect promoting homosexuality to children.

    If a parent disagrees, they are told they can take their child out of a public school and send them to a private school. The problem is that the parent can not afford private school.

    A child should not be taught to believe homosexuality is nature in my opinion. Instead, a child should be taught that it is possible to be influenced by a homosexual to engage in a homosexual act and if this happens, to seek their parents advise and guidance until they reach the age of maturity..

    • Citizen Tom says:

      I doubt the wisdom of putting government in charge of education. It’s like putting a fox in charge of a hen house.

      What is the right answer to the question of homosexuality? I think the Bible provides it, but what parents teach their children is their responsibility, not mine, yours or some busybody politician’s.

  4. Citizen Tom says:

    Islam is a warrior religion.

    It is well that war is so terrible, otherwise we should grow too fond of it. — Robert E. Lee in a Comment to James Longstreet, on seeing a Federal charge repulsed in the Battle of Fredericksburg (13 December 1862) (from here)

    Some men will always dream that it is only those “other people” who will find war terrible. So long as that is true, some men will always grow too fond of war.

  5. Pingback: A sinful nation in the hands of an angry God – Introduction | Christian Apologia

  6. Pingback: What Religion is Jihadism? « DeHavelle.com

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