Citizen Tom:

I suspect a frequent commenter here of late, joesix, will like this reblog.

Originally posted on sitting on the edge of the sandbox, biting my tongue:

I was on BART yesterday, coming home from meeting Professor Jacobson, when I spotted a dormant issue of the SF Chronicle.  Sad, sad paper with little to read that’s worth my time.  I was looking for something to hold my attention, when I saw an editorial by E. J. Dionne.  The columnist alleged to find a solution to restore upward mobility in America.  He starts of:

It’s good that conservatives are finally taking seriously the problems of inequality and declining upward mobility.

Thank you E. J!  Even our dense heads figured it out.  I’m all ears.

Reports from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and others show that social mobility is greater elsewhere, notably in Denmark, Australia, Norway, Finland, Canada, Sweden and Germany.

What do these countries have in common? Not to put too fine a point on it, all have national policies that are, in right-wing parlance…

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About Citizen Tom

I am just an average citizen interested in promoting informed participation in the political process.
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2 Responses to

  1. Thank you for the reblog and a thoughtful comment.

  2. joesix says:

    Hey, I made it to “frequent commenter” status! It’s an entertaining post, if anything. I’m not sure if the author is seriously suggesting the government pass laws or write strongly-worded statements that people should only get married after graduating, finding a job, and seeing 21 birthdays. He’s quick to point out the problems in Greece and Spain, but fails to reveal what’s really wrong in Denmark, Australia, Norway, Finland, Canada, Sweden, and Germany.

    In any case, I remain convinced that public education more than anything (even straight Christian parents) is the biggest contributor to social mobility ( http://www.brookings.edu/es/research/projects/foc/foc_16_2_summary.pdf ).

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